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Archive for March, 2010

God of War 3 will have been out for a full week by the time I post this, and I still haven’t bought it.  It’s a big change for me.  I love that series.  I picked up the first one early on the strength of Dave Jaffe’s development chops, and wasn’t disappointed. GoW2 was the perfect franchise second act, and pretty handy swan song for the PlayStation 2.  I even have fond memories of playing the series’ lone portable entry, Chains of Olympus, on my PSP on the way down to my bachelor party.

As I walked past GameStop on my way in to work last Tuesday, I was fully prepared to pick up GoW3.  But I just didn’t go back in that day.  Or the next day.  So many good games have come out recently, and since the birth of my daughter, I’ve barely had time to play the few of those that I could rationalize buying.  I still want to spend a lot more time with this year’s MLB The Show, and I have a few more crew members to recruit and a ton of missions still waiting for me in Mass Effect 2. For now, Kratos has met his match.  And it’s my adorable 4-month-old.

Since I read Stephen Totilo’s  arresting piece last month on how father figures have become central in games, I’ve been turning over in my head just what that story meant for me.  Totilo quite brilliantly eyed how more and more games (Heavy Rain, Bioshock 2, Silent Hill Shattered Memories to name a few)  put us in dad roles, and make fatherhood and fathering core to the game’s story and mechanics.

As a new dad myself, this makes a lot of sense.  Children motivate us to be better.  We learn things, sacrifice things, step outside of our comfort zones and adapt to almost anything as long as it’s for them. So for game designers, a compelling parent/child relationship among characters solves  a universal challenge: motivating the player to stick with your game. And from a purely business perspective, it’s even more of a no-brainer.  The generation that grew up playing Nintendo is right around 30 now, and haven’t put down their controllers en masse.  We’ve got mortgages and marriages and kids now, too.

But what good are all these newly “daddened” video games when we have barely any time to play them?  Did the collective industry miss the boat?

A very timely piece by The Question Block’s Matthew H. Mason (stumbled upon via Bitmob) helped put it all in perspective for me.  I play less often and have to play fewer games now, but that doesn’t mean I enjoy them less.  In Matt’s own words:

I can’t really summarize what video games mean to me; they strike me in both profound and simple ways. That will never change. Where I’ve found my path diverging is how I’ve come to appreciate them.

I’m lucky that I have a job where I need to keep up on this great industry of ours, and occasionally work with video games and the talented people that make them.   I’m lucky to have so many great games to play at home that I can leave Kratos’ latest adventure on the shelf for a few months.  It really speaks to the health of the industry that I can pass up one game with a 90+ Metacritic score for the two other 90+ scorers I have at home.  And I’m lucky to have a beautiful family that keeps me balanced, and helps me to better appreciate the time when I can just sit and play again.

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